Coronavirus questions answered

steve 30 January, 2020 0

What is coronavirus? How is it transmitted? What are the symptoms like and how dangerous is it? Dr Monica Mahajan, Director, Internal Medicine from Max Healthcare, answers all these questions and more. Watch now!

Coronaviruses are a group of viruses that cause diseases in mammals and birds. In humans, the viruses cause respiratory infections which are typically mild including the common cold but rarer forms like SARS and MERS can be lethal. In cows and pigs they may cause diarrhea, while in chickens they can cause an upper respiratory disease. There are no vaccines or antiviral drugs that are approved for prevention or treatment.

 

How dangerous is new coronavirus and how does it spread?

The virus has killed more than 100 people in China and has infected more than 4,520 globally, mostly in China. Chinese authorities have closed off almost 20 cities in efforts to contain a new coronavirus that has killed at least 170 people in recent weeks, with cases confirmed in several countries in Asia and beyond.

Coronavirus: A timeline

The spread of the coronavirus from the Chinese city of Wuhan is well underway, with 7,678 confirmed cases in mainland China as of 29 January. Elsewhere, the virus has already been confirmed in 19 other countries/territories, totaling 105 cases. So far, Johns Hopkins University has tracked 170 deaths caused by the pandemic.

The Guardian’s health editor, Sarah Boseley, answers some of the most common and pressing questions surrounding the recent coronavirus outbreak in Wuhan, China

The nCoV coronavirus has killed 170 people in China and infected 7,711. Around 100 cases have been confirmed outside China. Worryingly, it seems to transmit more readily between humans than Sars, a similar coronavirus that killed almost 800 people after it originated in China 17 years ago.

 

——————Corona Disease Basics——————–

 

What is 2019 Novel Coronavirus?

A: The 2019 Novel Coronavirus, or 2019-nCoV, is a new respiratory virus first identified in Wuhan, Hubei Province, China. Learn about 2019 Novel Coronavirus.

What is a novel coronavirus?

A: A novel coronavirus (CoV) is a new coronavirus that has not been previously identified.

What is the source of 2019-nCoV?

A: Public health officials and partners are working hard to identify the source of the 2019-nCoV. Coronaviruses are a large family of viruses, some causing illness in people and others that circulate among animals, including camels, cats and bats. Analysis of the genetic tree of this virus is ongoing to know the specific source of the virus. SARS, another coronavirus that emerged to infect people, came from civet cats, while MERS, another coronavirus that emerged to infect people, came from camels. More information about the source and spread of 2019-nCoV is available on the 2019-nCoV Situation Summary: Source and Spread of the Virus.

How does the virus spread?

A: This virus probably originally emerged from an animal source but now seems to be spreading from person-to-person. It’s important to note that person-to-person spread can happen on a continuum. Some viruses are highly contagious (like measles), while other viruses are less so. At this time, it’s unclear how easily or sustainably this virus is spreading between people. Learn what is known about the spread of newly emerged coronaviruses.

Is 2019-nCoV the same as the MERS-CoV or SARS virus?

A: No. Coronaviruses are a large family of viruses, some causing illness in people and others that circulate among animals, including camels, cats and bats. The recently emerged 2019-nCoV is not the same as the coronavirus that causes Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) or the coronavirus that causes Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS). However, genetic analyses suggest this virus emerged from a virus related to SARS. There are ongoing investigations to learn more. This is a rapidly evolving situation and information will be updated as it becomes available.

Prevention

How can I help protect myself?

A: Visit the 2019-nCoV Prevention and Treatment page to learn about how to protect yourself from respiratory illnesses, like 2019-nCoV.

What should I do if I had close contact with someone who has 2019-nCoV?

A: There is information for people who have had close contact with a person confirmed to have, or being evaluated for, 2019-nCoV infection available online.

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